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Vanner68
03-28-2001, 03:30 PM
Since I got this no-door, I've had the gearheads at work asking me what I'm gonna do with it. They tend to think that since it's so rare, I should restore it stock. Now, I'm not knocking a correct resto, but to me a restored stock van is kinda boring. I've done resto work on my boss's 64 Chevelle SS convertible, and a restored musclecar is more eyecatching than a restored commercial vehicle. So, I'm just wondering how many of you out there are doing a chalk mark correct resto, and how many are doing something custom. I consider putting an interior in a cargo van customizing, by the way, because Chevy didn't put an interior in there!

yote
03-28-2001, 07:04 PM
vanner 68....i just finished restoring a 1969 chevy p.u.,and 4 years ago a 65 chevelle, i like a stock looking vehicle on the exterior and the interior..but i like to bring the late model technology into the drive train.but in the case of my 69 396 camaro pace car i didn't need to up date the drive train. the general installed a 396/350 h.p. from the factory.wich does very well on its own,and if i altered the car from factory it would badly take away from the value...now my 66 chevy van is getting a stock look from the out side with the exception of 2" lowering and after-market tires and wheels.but now the interior will get a 70s style carpet cave and paneling look.kinda nostalgic looking.so i like both all stock... and light modifications...but the decision should be up to you...because your the owner and the one to enjoy it..so my advice is to build it the way you want..to please you...let us know of your decision...david.....yote

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66 chevy van,69 z-11 camaro pace car,97 camaro pace car

Vanner68
03-28-2001, 07:21 PM
I am definitely NOT doing any body changes, it already has a sunroof so that's gonna stay. I plan to paint it Hugger Orange when I'm done, and naming it "Vitamin GMC" on the right rear door. Interior will be simple, no bed, but a hammock hung diagonally. Gotta have a decent stereo. The six will remain for now, but I want to put in a TPI 350/700R4 combo and 4 wheel discs. But this is in the future.

ahighdiver
03-28-2001, 07:34 PM
The decision to restore to stock or custom or modified should be based on the rarity of the vehicle. That 65 Civil Defence Van should be kept stock As is. And if you have a 5% vehicle (low production munbers) you should consider a stock restoration.
Something like yours could be custom and not take away from the uniqueness or the value because of the commerical issue.
If cash value is an issue for you.
Modifiying should be very clean if it is to a rare vehicle. There are plenty of mainline production vehicles to use for modifieds.
However, in the end it's your van and you can do anything to it you want. After crashing into the back of my friends 68 while looking at the High Times center fold of pieote catus(not sure of the spelling of that)circa 1976. We used the hood of a 72 chevy p/u and tempest headlights to replace the front sheet metal. Just an oval cut for the grill.
Van On!
Ahighdiver.

tomschaner
03-28-2001, 07:41 PM
i too have restored a 69 chevelle ss to factory correct condition.the only comment i can express to you is to keep the outside all original.and as far as the inside don't worry about the stockness but if you don't bore big holes in anything you can always put her back to its original state.if you take parts off keep them boxed up so that if these babies ever do become very valuable in there orignal state you can always return it back to it.people that hot rod cars make the one fatal mistake of throwing away that stock stuff and as far as musclecars go thats a grave error in its value.as far as vans are concerned that is yet to be determined.use your own judgement but keep the taken-off parts.the only other option is to do two vans like i'm doing one stock and one hotrodded.later tom

Vanner68
03-28-2001, 08:06 PM
When I get the urge to do something wild to an early, I still have my 68 that I've owned since High School. It's been modified a bit already, and it's a G20 108" so it's not all that rare. The 70 GMC turned out to be a bit rarer than I originally thought, but I had never planned to do any body mods. It's just that I really like the idea of a stock appearing early with some nice wheels, a solid color paint job, and 90's tech drivetrain underneath. Best of both worlds I'd say. And If you ever see my garage, you'll see that I never throw ANYTHING away....

smiley
03-29-2001, 09:30 AM
I'd have to agree with ahighdiver on this one. If you are given to it, the vehicle should dictate the path of restoration.
However the course, I feel that as long you are making reversible mods, it's no big deal (i.e.: wheels & tires, custom paint).

ahighdiver
03-29-2001, 02:57 PM
There are some things that I have to do to any ride or rod, Wheels and tires, suspension. Stereo, Paint and Glass.
These things are as personal as your shades or your hat.

Dan Wilson
02-20-2002, 11:41 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Vanner68:
Since I got this no-door, I've had the gearheads at work asking me what I'm gonna do with it. They tend to think that since it's so rare, I should restore it stock. Now, I'm not knocking a correct resto, but to me a restored stock van is kinda boring. I've done resto work on my boss's 64 Chevelle SS convertible, and a restored musclecar is more eyecatching than a restored commercial vehicle. So, I'm just wondering how many of you out there are doing a chalk mark correct resto, and how many are doing something custom. I consider putting an interior in a cargo van customizing, by the way, because Chevy didn't put an interior in there!<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I found the subject of restored vans interesting in the archives. Seeing an early
in any condition around here is a treat. Calif has over 30 million bipeds but not many old vans[in nor cal anyway]We have a rather active crushing program that might be to blame. I never see vintage vans at any of the car shows either. I am keeping mine relativly mild on the mods. Clifford dual exhaust,2 inch white walls mounted on stock steelies with 60s style full wheel covers and lowered an inch or so.

AzDon
02-20-2002, 11:24 PM
On just about any vehicle I do, I remove excess body side trim and badges because I like it smooth but tasteful! Mags and tires?...ABSOLUTELY! and in this area,creative sizing (bigs and littles) can minimize the need to lower, if so an inch or two in the front. As for the philosophical part of the question: The vans in their original form project a starkness that says: "I'm a work vehicle!" They are not a complete bitchin vehicle like a 69 camaro or a vette. 3 door burbs, panel trucks, my son's flatbed 66 dually and especially these vans are not complete, bitchin vehicles until someone puts in the effort to make them completely bitchin! Nobody disagrees about the value of a deteriorated 69 camaro because everybody remembers how neat they were when new. It takes a person with imagination to see any future coolness in a deteriorated old truck or van! There is hope, even just thru support groups like this one and in the fact that 53-56 Ford pickups start out just as crude and they have become a movement! I had no idea that there were six other people on the planet that still liked the old flatbottoms when I first started my website....little did I know! And when I searched for Uriah Heep (my favorite band of all time) I discovered that they remain a worldwide phenomenon! ANYWAY!
back to the question....YES! CUSTOMIZE! that's what vans were put here for! But keep the tacky bodywork to a minimum! OK?

AzDon
02-21-2002, 11:17 AM
Put another way: You "restore" what was complete and bitchin from the factory to it's original condition.
Old trucks and vans,which were never intended to be comfortable,personal transportation as first sold,need to be completed in order to be "completely bitchin" for the first time!

FrameDragging
02-21-2002, 01:50 PM
I've given it a lot of thought over the last few years. My conclusion was that customizing and modifying was more fun than restoring. I don't like the idea of doing something irreversible to a vehicle that was highly impressive and exciting when new, so I tend to avoid such vehicles for projects. What's more, driving a "finished" project around gets old. When you are bent on improving on the original, there's no such thing as a finished project.

Twovanman
02-21-2002, 03:58 PM
Amen to that Framedragging and lets have another beer!!