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Thread: What the F is this

  1. #1
    New Guy Profnutbtr's Avatar
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    What the F is this

    Hey all,

    Sorry to be so crass. Anybody know if this is a power steering pump? Looks stock. I donít want to remove the belly pan if possible.

    Click image for larger version. 

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Name:	C3489628-3652-4907-9010-B3D51A133C64.jpg 
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Size:	76.8 KB 
ID:	40315Click image for larger version. 

Name:	C3489628-3652-4907-9010-B3D51A133C64.jpg 
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ID:	40315Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2
    VCVC Member Edoz's Avatar
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    I don't think our vans ever came with power steering, are there any lines that you can trace back to something?

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    VCVC Member uncle ron's Avatar
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    what the

    looks like a California smog pump .

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    Uncle Ron is Correct

    That is what is commonly known as a smog pump. Actually it pumps air, not exhaust. It pulls air in and dumps it into the exhaust manifold. It works by means of the "Fire Triangle" effect. For a fire you need Heat, Fuel and Oxygen. For those who were never boy scouts; in the exhaust manifold is two of the three elements of the fire triangle needed for a fire. There's plenty of heat and plenty of fuel. Just add a little oxygen and the "burning" continues in the exhaust manifold which reduces emissions. Problems happen when that one way check valve fails. Then exhaust gas does get into the pump which quickly causes it to seize up. Once seized the belt slips, smokes and eventually falls off (creating noise, emissions and highway litter). With or without it, no performance difference will be noted (even on a dyno run) since the pump draws very little power, (check the size of the belt or pulley.) If you had an exhaust gas analyzer you'd sure see the difference. Pinch off that hose between the pump and the check valve and watch the HC (unburned fuel) and CO (partially burned fuel) go way up. Even here in KaliForKneeYa, they no longer emissions check our vans so do with it as you will. I always told people that if they were determined to remove it, to at least keep the brackets. You never know when they might require it again. Back in the day, many who removed it paid big bucks to get the parts to put it back on. At this point it's highly unlikely they will require it ever again, but remember; No man's life, liberty or happiness is safe while the legislature is in session.
    One good thing about the cylinder head that you have there is the ports where the air injection manifold goes in. If memory serves, they are 1/8" pipe fittings which make them an ideal head to have redone by a machine shop. I say this because the head is usually interchangeable on 230, 250 and 292 blocks. So if you spend a bunch of money to build a performance head, you could easily install K type thermocouples in these ports. That would give you an exhaust temperature reading on each cylinder. They should be close to each other in temperature. As the exhaust valves wear, the temperature will go way up on the bad cylinder. Anything over 1,000 F is trouble. You can spot a bad valve this way and schedule a valve job. Bad exhaust valves are the reason so many exhaust manifolds are cracked from excessive heat. Once that exhaust valve starts leaking, it heats up that manifold like someone holding an increasingly larger blowtorch to it. These six cylinder engines usually go through two heads per short block from my experience. No sense taking out an exhaust manifold if you can help it. So if you did remove the air injection manifold, I would just cap off the holes in the head with 1/8" pipe plugs coated generously with anti-seize compound.
    Too much information?
    108VanGuy...
    Last edited by 108VanGuy; 08-31-2019 at 09:27 AM.
    1969 Chevy Panel, 250 CID, 3 Spd.with OD, 3.36 "WedgieVan" Daily Driver
    1967 Chevy Panel, 230 CID, 3 Spd. 3.36 "UtiliVan" 292 TFI coming. Owned since 76
    1964 GMC Panel, 194 CID, 3 Spd. "CrunchoVan"
    1965 GMC HandiBus Custom, 194 CID, 3 Spd. "MilkVan" Seized Engine
    1965 Chevy Panel 350 CID, 3 Spd. "RustoRoof" Runs but wiring bad
    1969 Chevy 108 Display 307 CID THM 350 Power Brakes 3.73 Posi
    1965 Chevy Panel, V8, 3 Spd. "Gold Hills Van" Best body of my 65s
    1965 CamperVan, V8, 3 Spd.

  5. #5
    VCVC Member kookykrispy's Avatar
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    Smog pump. The brackets may be useful for retrofitting an A/C compressor



    64' wikivan 230/4 onda tree/2.56 posi
    '64 Red Baron no engine/trans
    '66 "Lucky" 230/3 onda tree/project

    Quote Originally Posted by Vanner68 View Post
    Remember, they're still printing money, but they aren't making any more earlies!

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    New Guy Profnutbtr's Avatar
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    Wow

    So much good info! Iím removing it and plugging the holes but leaving the brackets. Itís a pain in the ass to get to the front plug and distributor with it on.

    Never too too much info 108

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    VCVC Member m1dadio's Avatar
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    Dang! all this time I thought that was the Flux Capacitor Eh!
    Don't ask me!! I'm still stuck on "who am I?" and "What do I want?"

    1965 G10 all window "ChevyVan" with 1988 305 Tuned port injection V8, 700R4, 1980 10 bolt posi.
    1968 G10 "sportVan Custom" under construction.

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    VCVC Member van-itti's Avatar
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    SAVE IT!

    I removed all that stuff and plugged the holes.
    Everything went in the recycle bin...BIG oops.
    There are guys looking for this kind of thing trying to make a stock set-up on whatever engine.

    Take it off but put it on a shelf..or Epay.
    Youll have a second pulley all set for A/C or power steering!
    Mike

  9. #9
    Certifiable Vanatic
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    This is a "Reply with Quote" without the quote: Wow, 108, that is some impressive recall on forgotten technology!!

    As for never knowing what the crazy CA legislature will do, I figure the day will come when all cars older than year 19XX will be outlawed regardless of historical nature and be banned from the road. Unless you convert it to electric, hybrib, fuel cell, nuclear, etc. etc.

    Actually, if a person was rich, it might be interesting to do a Tesla drivetrain swap with one of our vans (like what Neil Young has done with some old cars). Especially since some think GM might have built an all electric G10 concept vehicle way back.

  10. #10
    VCVC Member jrinaman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VanSandy View Post
    Especially since some think GM might have built an all electric G10 concept vehicle way back.
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	40320 1966 electrovan.
    '64 chevy, 292 40 over, 206/526 cam, 2004r trans. 9.75:1, dual webbers, Langdon cast headers, 1.94 valves

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